Plagiarism

 

WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?

Plagiarism is the taking and passing off as one's own, the ideas, writings, or work, of another. Simply put, if you write a paper, report, or give any oral presentation in class you get your information from any article, book, magazine, newspaper, or other source, you are committing plagiarism if you DO NOT, clearly show in your paper, the source and what specific information came from that source.

SEVERAL EXAMPLES

a. If you copy something word for word and do not put it in quotation marks and state the source.

b. If you take another person's words and/or ideas, rearranging them and restating them without mentioning the source.

c. If you copy a paper from another student or source including using another's ideas, even if reworded.

d. If you have someone else's help with the organization, content, or editing, of a paper or report.

e. If you permit others to use your work.

WHEN DO YOU USE A SOURCE CITATION?

If you can go to the source and point to a passage, chapter, or phrases and say, "this is where the idea came from," then it must be cited. Follow this general rule: if the information is widely known or held to be true, then it does not have to have a specific reference. However, when in doubt, include the source citation.

 A FEW OTHER WORDS

Most instructors know when they have read a paper twice, especially good papers. Everyone's writing style is distinctive--much like everyone has distinctive fingerprints--so most instructors will be able to identify a paper which has been written by someone other than yourself. Be safe! Do your ownwork. Cite your sources.

See also:
        Graduate School Policy on Academic Conduct

Revised 7/99

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Copyright 1999 Raymond S. Kulzick - Last modified: September 13, 2008